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Special Studies

Special Studies

College of Arts and Sciences

Each semester the College of Arts and Sciences offers Special Studies courses that are based on the interests of our students and faculty. Special Studies courses are found on each semester’s schedule under the numbers of 297, 397, 497 and Graduate Studies 597.

Due to the nature of Special Studies courses, some of them are offered for only one semester. Below is a listing of the most current offerings.

Spring 2016

  • ACSC 597/697 Thesis/Research –
  • ADSA 497 Special Studies: Ceramics – This course will focus on skill development, special interest topics, creating a body of work and/or contemporary art and design events with in the context of ceramics. Students will employ some of the basic processes of working with clay, including hand-building and experimental methods to create sculptural and functional work. The course will encompass basic glazing and surface treatments, as well as, and the aesthetics of form and function as they relate to works in clay.
  • ADSA 497 Special Studies: Jewelry/Metals – advanced metalsmithing courses are offered periodically based on faculty and student interests. This course will focus on skill development, special interest topics, creating a body of work and/or contemporary art and design events with in the context of metalsmithing.
  • ADSA 497 Special Studies: Painting – for advanced painting students who are beginning to assemble a consistent body of work that is thematically related. This course may be repeated for credit and may be taken for 3-6 credits. Students must be self-motivated and willing to share ideas, criticisms, and inspiration. Students must have a high work ethic in studio. There will be emphasis on developing an artistic voice in each student. Third semester students will also be encouraged to offer their knowledge and experience while working along-side of first and second semester painters.
  • CRIM 297 Police Report Writing – This course has been designed to teach the student how to become an efficient reporter writer, allowing them the opportunity to learn what it takes to complete a detailed report in any report writing situation. The student will become familiar with terminology and report writing technical skills that are used and accepted by most police agencies.
  • ENGL 297 Leadership Ethics and Literature – Novels, plays, and film help us to understand a variety of human roles and experiences. The role of leader, the attributes of a good or bad leader, and the variety of people who inhabit leadership positions are several of the issues which this class will explore. Other issues to be considered are the ethical dimension of leadership, the concepts of human character and motivation, and the habits of mind which define leaders as well as failures. The class will “watch” leaders as they think, worry, hope, hesitate, commit, regret, reflect, and fail while they take on adversity from the culture, from political structures or from friends and even family.
  • HIST 297/397 African American History – This course is a survey of African-American History from the African background to today. Topics include the Middle Passage experience; enslaved Africans and African Americans in British North American; African Americans and the American Revolution; Slavery and Antebellum America; Civil War and Reconstruction; African Americans in a Globalizing America to the Second World War; Cold War and Civil Rights; Black Power to the present
  • HUM 297 Leadership Ethics and Literature – Novels, plays, and film help us to understand a variety of human roles and experiences. The role of leader, the attributes of a good or bad leader, and the variety of people who inhabit leadership positions are several of the issues which this class will explore. Other issues to be considered are the ethical dimension of leadership, the concepts of human character and motivation, and the habits of mind which define leaders as well as failures. The class will “watch” leaders as they think, worry, hope, hesitate, commit, regret, reflect, and fail while they take on adversity from the culture, from political structures or from friends and even family.
  • LEGL 297 Intro to Law, Legal Testimony and Ethics – This course introduces students to the American legal system, ethics in both the legal and forensic science fields, and courtroom testimony. The course will survey the organization of the federal and state court systems, procedural and substantive criminal law, some aspects of civil law, and how to find the law. The course will also survey the ethical rules promulgated for the practice of law and their application to those working in the forensic science field together with some of the ethical codes within the forensic science field itself. The course will include a survey of forensic science professionals’ courtroom testimony, as well as eyewitness statements and testimony.
  • ORGL 297 Leadership Ethics and Literature – Novels, plays, and film help us to understand a variety of human roles and experiences. The role of leader, the attributes of a good or bad leader, and the variety of people who inhabit leadership positions are several of the issues which this class will explore. Other issues to be considered are the ethical dimension of leadership, the concepts of human character and motivation, and the habits of mind which define leaders as well as failures. The class will “watch” leaders as they think, worry, hope, hesitate, commit, regret, reflect, and fail while they take on adversity from the culture, from political structures or from friends and even family.
  • PSYC 297 Anthropological Psychology – This course explores basic psychological concepts such as “self,” “other” and “emotional normalcy” by looking at these categories through a cross-cultural lens. We examine the interface between perception, emotion, cultural schemas, personal narratives and our experience of selfhood by probing the complex relationships between internal psychology and external socio-cultural discourse.
  • PSYC 297 Careers in Social Sciences – This course provides students with career information within the broad field of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, organizational leadership, etc). Students will develop a career plan by being given guidance on how to research occupations, apply to graduate programs and internships, create personal statements, develop a resume, and find jobs using their chosen degree within the social sciences.
  • PSYC 397 Evolutionary Psychology – This course explores how biological evolution relates to human psychology. Students will learn how evolutionary principles apply to psychological theory and research, covering topics that include romantic relationships, family relationships (including parenting and sibling dynamics), friendship and cooperation, judgment and decision making, clinical pathology, and religious belief.
  • SOC 397 Sociology of Religion – Religion is a human endeavor and a universal cultural trait. Anthropologists and sociologists have established that amongst our vast socio-cultural diversity, one cultural universal is a system of rituals and beliefs that are articulated toward a metaphysical dimension of reality. These beliefs take many forms, such as karma, mana, spirits, devils, gods, angels, apparitions, miracles, fate, destiny, rebirth, nirvana, heavens, hells, etc. Social science might ask what is the utility of these metaphysical beliefs? Are such musings as these mere illusionary simulacra or has a concern with metaphysical things actually been crucial in the stunning success of our species over the past several hundred thousand years? As science becomes increasingly powerful as an explanatory system, is there still a need for speculation on the metaphysical? This course is not designed to be a class on the ‘history of religion,’ but rather tries to look at what theory and methodologies social science can bring to the study of belief. We will explore the question of how our metaphysical theories, cultural conceptions of God(s) and ethical systems may have co-evolve? Human theories about metaphysical things have a potentially profound impact on our internal psychologies and the external social landscape within which we live out our biological lives. Is there perhaps an adaptive impetus for the human species to be concerned with nonmaterial modalities of being? Why do biological organisms, especially humans, sometimes act in altruistic ways, aiding others at an expense to ourselves? What does the world look like when we view humanity as a social organism and cross-culturally examine our diverse theories of the metaphysical realm from a socially embedded and evolutionary perspective? In this seminar we will use modern social theories of functional utility and diverse sociological and anthropological insights on belief and ritual systems to explore these questions.