Walker Hall Construction


London, England


(Session I: May 17 – June 14 Session II: June 14 – July 12)

londonStudents live and study in the most cosmopolitan city in the world.  This means that living in London is, in a sense, living anywhere in the world.  Explore the food, culture, clothing, art, and music of every continent in the world.  London is also the world center for many types of business:  finance, public relations and advertising, and the creative industries.  Live and learn in the center of London in Nido student accommodations in Kings Cross.
Each of the two sessions is 4 weeks.  While the focus is on business, Session I also offers courses in the social sciences and the humanities.  Most courses will be taught by a London professor.
Total cost for 6 credits is $5,300 plus airfare.  This includes tuition, room and board, a local transportation card (Oyster Card), local excursions, insurance, and the trip to Stonehenge and Bath.  Students may add a third course, experiencing the Culture of London, for $750.

Session I (May 17 – June 14):  3-Credit Courses:

Courses in Business and Economics

  • The Global Business Environment

This course uses the established concept of a PESTEL analysis to evaluate the issues which lead to success in the contemporary world of global business. The tools of economic analysis, political risk assessment and the sociology of intercultural understanding will form the basis for discussion of critical success factors.

Case studies will illustrate the importance of intercultural awareness and sensitivity in doing business transnational.

  • International Financeparade

Strong financial management lies at the heart of good business decision making. In a global context, these issues can be very complex. London lies at the centre of global financial markets and is the perfect place to study these issues. Amongst the topics covered will be exchange rate management and other issues which affect the financial well being of multinational corporations – investment, capital budgeting, cash management etc.  The course will be enhanced by visits to key institutions in The City (London’s financial district) such as the Bank of England.

  • Macroeconomics: A Global Perspective

The key issues in Macroeconomic theory are examined from a global perspective. Issues of GNP and wealth creation and distribution, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade and finance will be investigated. Emphasis will be placed on the role of international economic institutions such as the IMF and trading blocs such as NAFTA and the EU.

  • Practicums in Business and Social Enterprise

            Working in small groups, students will undertake a research project for a London‑based client, with interests which reflect the students’ field of study. Projects vary enormously but might typically require the construction of a questionnaire and the conduct of field research into a marketing or management problem the client has identified or a fundraising project for a major charity. The team will often bring a fresh perspective to management issues and the project always culminates in a presentation of research findings and recommendations to the client.

Courses in Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences

  • British Life and Culture

Through guest lectures and field trips, all students will survey British culture and life as reflected in the various institutions and historical sites and perspectives which contribute to the ‘British way of life’. This course will unravel the complex economic, social and political issues which have created modern Britain

  • The Arts in London

This unique course provides an opportunity for students with a special interest in the general field of the Arts and Humanities to undertake independent study in their chosen specialisation in a London context.  Twice weekly meetings of the group will explore the vibrant world of London’s museums, galleries, theatres, concert halls and literary locations. Beyond this, individual students will work on a project, in consultation with the course tutor, which reflects their special interests.  Interested students are encouraged to contact the Academic Director to discuss options and opportunities in more detail.

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  • American Foreign Policy Since World War II: A Global Perspective

America is still regarded as the richest and most powerful nation in the world. Its influence on the world stage is undeniable but often perceived differently from outside the U.S. than from inside.  This course deliberately sets out to provide an external perspective. Often controversial, professors will examine America’s role, historically and currently, in all parts of the globe. Topics may include Europe since the Second World War, Russia and the Cold War, Vietnam and South East Asia, The Middle East, Latin America and China.

 

 

  • Experiencing the Culture of London – James Harf (Maryville)

This 3-credit course allows students to prepare for and reflect upon a wide range of both group and individual excursions during their program in London.  Students will participate in several excursions in and around London, including Stonehenge and Bath.  Additionally, students will select 15 individual excursions in and around London, approved by the professor at least one month prior to departure for London.

These latter 15 locations:  (1) could represent a variety of student interests and would be simply used by the student to fulfil the total number of elective credits toward graduation; or (2) may be tied closely to a student’s general education requirements; or (3) may be tied to a student’s major/minor.  In the latter two cases, the student should also seek prior approval of the list of 15 sites from his/her campus academic advisor if the course is to be used for a student’s general education requirements or major/minor academic program. The selected sites in these cases will relate to the specific discipline(s) of the general education area or the major/minor program.  The student will write two short papers for each excursion, a “before excursion” paper where the student describes the reason for the choice and what he/she expects to find, and an “after excursion” paper where the student reflects on his/her experience.  The 15 “before excursion” papers are due prior to arrival in London and the 15 “after excursion” paper are due one month following the end of the London portion of the program.  This allows you expanded time beyond your time in London to complete the work.

Session II (June 14 – July 12):  3-Credit Courses:

Courses in Business and Economics

  • International Money and Finance (Felix Kwan: business – Maryville)

ferris-wheelThis course focuses on international financial linkages and monetary arrangements.  It covers international trade & payments, international investment & capital flows, and international banking & money markets.  Students will look into the basic workings of the foreign-exchange market and the movements of exchange rates.  To foster true learning, the course employs theoretical groundwork, visits to financial institutions, seminar discussions, and guest speakers.   London, the financial center of the world, presents a unique setting which allows students to experience a real-life feel for this course’s topics.

  • Practicums in Business and Social Enterprise

            Working in small groups, students will undertake a research project for a London‑based client, with interests which reflect the students’ field of study. Projects vary enormously but might typically require the construction of a questionnaire and the conduct of field research into a marketing or management problem the client has identified or a fundraising project for a major charity. The team will often bring a fresh perspective to management issues and the project always culminates in a presentation of research

Courses in Arts and Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Experiencing the Culture of London – James Harf (Maryville)

statueThis 3-credit course allows students to prepare for and reflect upon a wide range of both group and individual excursions during their program in London.  Students will participate in several excursions in and around London, including Stonehenge and Bath.  Additionally, students will select 15 individual excursions in and around London, approved by the professor at least one month prior to departure for London.

 

These latter 15 locations:  (1) could represent a variety of student interests and would be simply used by the student to fulfil the total number of elective credits toward graduation; or (2) may be tied closely to a student’s general education requirements; or (3) may be tied to a student’s major/minor.  In the latter two cases, the student should also seek prior approval of the list of 15 sites from his/her campus academic advisor if the course is to be used for a student’s general education requirements or major/minor academic program. The selected sites in these cases will relate to the specific discipline(s) of the general education area or the major/minor program.  The student will write two short papers for each excursion, a “before excursion” paper where the student describes the reason for the choice and what he/she expects to find, and an “after excursion” paper where the student reflects on his/her experience.  The 15 “before excursion” papers are due prior to arrival in London and the 15 “after excursion” paper are due one month following the end of the London portion of the program.  This allows you expanded time beyond your time in London to complete the work.


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