Leaders Of Tomorrow


April 23, 2007

ST. LOUIS – Fifteen Maryville University students have been inducted into the University’s Keith Lovin Institute for Leadership and Values for the 2007-08 academic year. The students, or fellows, were selected based on their leadership ability and potential, appreciation for community service and effective communication, said Scott Geer, graduate assistant for the Institute.

The Institute bears the name of former Maryville University President Keith Lovin, who, in 1998, developed the concept for the organization. Leadership Institute fellows for the 2007-08 academic year are listed below by hometown and major:

Illinois
• Edwards – Kendria Boddie, major: Actuarial Science
• Morton – Jennifer Burk, major: Physical Therapy

Indiana
• Indianapolis – Cari Ranck, major: Actuarial Science

Missouri
• Bourbon – Brianna Dawson, major: Biology
• Chesterfield – Monica Hashemi, major: Paralegal Studies
• Fenton – Joel Hermann, major: Communication & Organizational Leadership; Robert Huckstep, major: Marketing
• Florissant – Kelly O’Brien, major: Physical Therapy
• Jackson – Katie Loos, major: Physical Therapy
• Kirkwood – AJ Renaud, major: Organizational Leadership
• St. Louis – Chris Bouton, major: Physical Therapy; Amanda Umlah, major: Organizational Leadership
• St. Paul – Grace Corcoran, major: Biology
• St. Peters – Laura Fecht, major: Nursing

Nebraska
• Omaha – Nicholas Pierce-Cramer, major: Criminology

Maryville University, founded in 1872, is a private, coeducational institution offering approximately 50 undergraduate, seven master’s and two doctoral degree programs to 3,300 students. Ranked by U.S. News and World Report as one of America’s Best Colleges in the Midwest, Maryville University prepares its students for successful and meaningful careers by offering programs that integrate liberal arts with professional studies.

Among Maryville’s most recent graduates, 94 percent are employed or attending graduate school. Approximately 15,000 alumni work and live in the St. Louis region.


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