Music At Maryville Concert To Feature Quartet


January 22, 2007

A quartet including Saint Louis Symphony violinist and concertmaster David Halen will be the featured performers in the next Music at Maryville concert, sponsored by Maryville University. The concert will be held at 3 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 11, in the Maryville University Auditorium.

The quartet, which also includes Halen’s wife, soprano Miran Halen; cellist Savely Schuster; and pianist Katja Georgieff, professor emerita of music at Maryville University, will perform a concert of instrumental and vocal chamber music. Selections will include Robert Schumann’s “Fantasy Pieces” for ‘cello and piano, and Franz Schubert’s “Trio in B-flat major” for violin, cello and piano.

Admission for Music at Maryville concerts is $8 for adults and $5 for senior citizens. Students are admitted free.

The Music At Maryville concert series is now in its 26th year. The series was founded in 1980 by Katja Georgieff, then director of Maryville’s music program, as a way of spotlighting classical music on the Maryville campus, and continues to attract internationally renowned, classically trained musicians. Through the years, the series, which started in Huttig Chapel and moved to the University Auditorium in 2001, has featured such talent as pianist Claude Frank, cellist Leslie Parnas, and St. Louis Symphony violinist David Halen and his wife, soprano Miran Halen.

For more information on the 2006-2007 Music At Maryville concert series, call (314) 529-9411.

Maryville University, founded in 1872, is a private, coeducational institution offering approximately 50 undergraduate, seven master’s and two doctoral degree programs to 3,300 students. Ranked by U.S. News and World Report as one of America’s Best Colleges in the Midwest, Maryville University prepares its students for successful and meaningful careers by offering programs that integrate liberal arts with professional studies. Among Maryville’s most recent graduates, 94 percent are employed or attending graduate school. Approximately 15,000 alumni work and live in the St. Louis region.


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